Conscious Aging: Electric Car

I got my first ride in Matt’s new car, an electric Tesla, what the kids call “Daddy’s fast car.” The car is fast indeed, and peppy, and quiet. Matt says it’s good in the snow. He charges it overnight about twice a week at home. Operating it is much less expensive than a gasoline-powered car: no oil changes. No carburetor. No transmission. Just two batteries, and a control panel that looks like your computer screen. Did I mention that the car drives itself along a straight route, knowing when to stop, knowing how to navigate curves, knowing where all other cars are in relation to it? In this pic Matt has his hands lightly on the wheel, but the car is driving itself. The computer screen is giving real time information, and that’s where everything happens: no more control panel, gas gauge, seat heater buttons, clock, speed indicator.

The control panel also has funny things, to keep driver and passengers amused: you can program it to fart from any seat. I know, boy humor.  My late husband Jerry would have found this hilarious.

I told Matt I’m sort of thinking of getting a new car, and he said I should absolutely go electric. No sense buying a gas propelled car any more — that era has passed.

It would be an adjustment, but I’m open to the thought.

In the pic, notice the dashboard. There’s nothing on it — just the computer. Oh, and the car updates itself on a regular basis, just like your phone or free standing computer.

Remarkable.

4 thoughts on “Conscious Aging: Electric Car

  1. for Katie: I have to say that driving along in a car that was driving itself, knew the speed limit and adjusted accordingly, showed us in real time on the computer screen where all the cars around us were, was alternately exhilarating and terrifying. I wonder about computer glitches affecting the car’s operation, but Matt doesn’t. 🙂

  2. I do share your concerns. My first thought was what do you do in a blackout that lasts for days? We had no power for 9 days after Hurricane Sandy. I guess you drive elsewhere.

  3. for Katie: Hadn’t even thought about a power outage …that’s another concern, especially if widespread. I’ll tell you, it was an odd feeling for the car to be self-driving also. Matt had his hands lightly on the wheel, as you are apparently supposed to do, but he wasn’t driving it. The car was driving itself.

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