Conscious Aging: Losing our Emotional Anchors

That Minga, an illiterate woman from a small village in rural Panama, and I would have ever met, much less formed a friendship and deep emotional bond, is quite a random event. There are very few sets of circumstances — Peace Corps volunteer service being one — that would have led to our paths crossing.

But cross they did, and Minga became one of the emotional anchors of my life. There were others, primarily women — Bern, Alice — who served that role for decades, and have died within the last few years. As Minga’s health worsens, I have to face the likelihood that she too will die much sooner than I had hoped.

In our 70’s we become “the elders”,  the emotional anchors for people younger than we are — but we do so while losing our own deep structures of support.

I’m not sure I ever really thought about that before.

4 thoughts on “Conscious Aging: Losing our Emotional Anchors

  1. I know what a void this will leave in your life. I hope that Minga’s presence for many years will offer some comfort.
    Thinking of both of you.

    Linda

  2. I am so sorry to hear this, Dr.Klainer. Minga has clearly had a great emotional influence in your life. I hope you get to see her again before she deteriorates much further.

  3. for Frances: As you will see from the next update, she is doing better physically. But she is becoming rather cantankerous, which has her family completely upended about how to help her. I’m wondering if her progressing illness has caused some cognitive decline as well. Aging, as we all know, is hard.

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