“Marmite Amnesty”

You all know, if you read the blog on a regular basis, that I’m drawn to the odd quirky moments of life. That includes foods which are specific to culture or place, i.e. marmite. Our local very British crumpet shop offers marmite as one of its toppings — although I’ve never heard anyone order it. Marmite is a salty yeast paste that is apparently still beloved by the Brits. Jars of it are one of the things that commonly gets confiscated from the luggage of British travelers.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2017/jul/31/marmite-amnesty-under-way-at-london-city-airport?mc_cid=c51790d677&mc_eid=31ce25868b

Friend and regular reader Ada has a strong British heritage, and she knew of marmite. She plans a visit to Seattle and has expressed curiosity about The Crumpet Shop. The question is whether we’ll blow a perfectly good crumpet in the service of nostalgia, i.e. trying marmite.

Do you have any experience, past or current, with foods that are a bit quirky and specific to your culture/ethnicity? Haggis is one for Scottish people. After the Tartan Day parade in April, hosts Ron and Katie took all of us to a Scottish restaurant in Midtown, where we sampled ramekins of haggis with tatties and neeps. That’s boiled sheep stomach with other sheep organs cut up, seasoned, and stuffed inside, then served with mashed potatoes and turnips.

Is there anything in your culture that would go in that same culinary bucket? I’d love to hear. Regional foods make the cut: my Iowa relatives used to eat fruit pie milk shakes — you dump a piece of fruit pie, crust and all, into a vanilla milk shake and turn on the machine — and turkey fries, which are pan friend turkey testicles served on Saltine crackers. I only ate the latter because my cousin Bob served them to me, and if I didn’t love the thought much less the taste of turkey fries, I did love Bob.

3 thoughts on ““Marmite Amnesty”

  1. for Lana: Thanks for the reminder — Marmite it is. Sounds as if you know the product. I’ll have to give it a taste one of these days. Thanks for the comment too.

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