Panama Visits: Minga and her Great-Granddaughter

Panama is celebrating patronales, a country-wide celebration of Panamanian history and culture and heritage.  As you can see, people dress up, and there are parades and other festivities. Minga is celebrating with her great-granddaughter, Grisel. Minga looks thinner to me, which may be intentional — her kidney specialist wants her to keep her weight down. Lily tells me that Minga has gotten good reports on her latest medical tests; her kidney disease seems fairly stable. I’ll be seeing her, and Grisel, in January.

Minga’s dress is beautiful; I think she looks lovely. Rufina probably made it, and Grisel’s outfit too.

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6 thoughts on “Panama Visits: Minga and her Great-Granddaughter

  1. for Phyllis: Yes, it is good news. I think Minga looks wonderful. She is a beautiful woman, and she’s always liked to look nice — not available to her when she was a young woman because of her poverty. But now, she can dress up and put on some jewelry — often gifts from my guests who visit Panama — and go out with the best of them.

  2. for Louise: They are. Minga is so proud of her large extended family, many of whom live in the village. I think it’s particularly so since Minga herself grew up without a mother or father and without siblings. Now, when she goes to a celebration in the village, where everyone turns out, she is able to say to herself and others: “this is my family. These are the people to whom I belong.”

  3. Beautiful photo. Minga does look thinner, and I do see the hint of a look,on her face that isn’t in the realm of pure torture in front of the camera! Tilt of the head, the mouth has a kind of start to something….she’s coming along!

  4. for J: She really loves having pretty clothes. Didn’t have any as a young woman when I knew her in the Peace Corps — every penny that came her way, and there were few of them, went for her kids. At one point back then she had a terrible toothache. No dental care available, but she could have it pulled in the district capital. Fifty cents each way for a ride and a dollar to pull the tooth. I gave her the two bucks, and you know she didn’t use to to relieve her own pain. She used it for the kids.

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